Articles Tagged with California child support attorneys

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court ordered child supportNon-custodial parents are required by law to provide some level of financial support (court ordered child support payments) to their children in any divorce decree. That being said, why are custodial parents owed nearly $20 billion in California alone? If you have hit a wall when it comes to collecting child support payments from your child’s parent, an experienced local attorney might be helpful.

Court Ordered Child Support Payments – Why?

Parents are obliged to provide for their children, whether or not they are, or have ever been, married. If an individual contests the claim of fatherhood, a paternity test can clear matters up rather quickly. At that point, some amount of child support is legally required for biological children. This court ordered child support is intended to assist in providing a home, food, clothing, and other basic needs. Even if earnings are minimal, the responsibility to contribute to that child’s well-being is indisputable, and court ordered child support payments will generally be enforced until that child is no longer a minor.  Children with special needs may need support beyond that time.

What to do if Court Ordered Child Support Payments are Not Made

In many circumstances, parents work out among themselves how court ordered child support payments will be made. In other situations, parents are forced to ask for wages to be garnished in order to collect court-ordered child support. These earnings assignments direct an employer to withhold support payments from regular paychecks. Within 10 days of receiving the garnishment order, employers must begin holding back funds. Theses monies will be sent to the California State Disbursement Unit (SDU), and will ultimately be sent to the custodial parent.

If the Non-paying Spouse is Not Regularly Employed

A number of things can be done to motivate parents who are not making court-ordered child support payments, including:

  • It can be reported to credit reporting agencies and impact the individual’s credit rating;
  • Passport applications can be denied to persons owing $2,500 or more in back child support;
  • Property liens may be filed against land or houses owned by the individual;
  • Drivers’ licenses and state-issued professional licenses, such as those for cosmetology, teaching, contracting, medicine and others,  may be withheld or revoked;
  • Vehicles, boats, cash, and property can be taken by the Franchise Tax Board if late payments exceed $100 and are more than two months past due;
  • Tax refunds can be intercepted.
  • Unemployment and disability benefits can be captured;

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Published on:

child supportChild support. Raising children is expensive. When a couple chooses not to raise their child together, it does not absolve either parent of the financial responsibilities associated with raising that child. From a legal standpoint, some amount of child support is mandatory from both parents, and failing to provide that support could result in civil and/or criminal consequences. If you are concerned about child-support calculations, a good family law attorney may be helpful.

Obtaining Child Support

There are several circumstances wherein a court may order child support. They include:

  • Divorce;
  • Legal separation;
  • Paternity cases.

Income Considered in Child Support Determinations

Net disposable incomes of both parents are examined when making child support determinations.  The mathematical calculation used to determine the amount of support ordered by the court considers any and all income, including:

  • Salary, wages or earnings from self-employment;
  • Commission;
  • Tips;
  • Benefits from unemployment;
  • Workers’ compensation benefits;
  • Disability benefits;
  • Social security benefits;
  • Pension payouts;
  • Interest or dividend payments;
  • Lottery or other winnings.

Once the gross income is determined for each parent, the net disposable income is calculated by subtracting costs such as:

  • Taxes;
  • Mandatory union dues;
  • Health care premiums;
  • Required contributions to retirement accounts;
  • Costs associated with raising children from other relationships.

Other Considerations

The court will consider other factors, including childcare costs, school expenses, health care costs, and costs associated with visitation when parents live far apart. Some of these expenses are considered add-ons and may be divided equally between parents, or contributions may be based on each person’s disposable income. Additionally, children with special needs may incur further expenses to be considered by the court.

Once the final income calculations have been made, a child support payment is calculated based on the percentage of time the child spends with each parent.

Documentation Needed for Child Support

In order to make the most accurate calculations, parents will be asked to provide a number of documents, including:

  • Tax returns for the past year or two;
  • Paystubs from the past few months;
  • Insurance premium documentation;
  • Certification of mandatory retirement contributions;
  • Child support and spousal support information for other relationships;
  • Receipts for child care costs;
  • Other costs related to extraordinary circumstances.
What Happens to Parents Who do Not Pay Child Support?

Payment of child support is a serious business. When child support payments are not made, the consequences can be embarrassing and troublesome. Wages may be garnished, credit ratings may be impacted, and liens may be placed on property. There are additional consequences that many people do not know about: Passports may not be issued or renewed, and driver’s licenses could be revoked or suspended. The IRS could capture past due funds from tax refunds, and other government funds such as unemployment or workers’ compensation may be taken. Ultimately, criminal charges may be filed with associated fines and jail time. Continue reading →

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